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Top Tips For Developing A Painting – Part 3: Adding Detail

By | Care Home

In this three part special, we give top tips for beginners to pick up their paintbrushes – no matter what their ability.

Now we’ve covered the foundations of sketching here, and starting to paint here, it’s time to add the final detail! Jack McKechnie, our expert Lead Wellbeing Coordinator, guides us through it…

Precise Detail

The fun now begins as you can start to add more detail to your paintings. Now that the previous layers have dried, you can start to add in more detail, such as trees or boats. When adding more precise detail, it works best to use a smaller brush.

Tones & Shades

You can also add darker tones or shades to give the painting a more three dimensional feel. You could use pencil or pen when the painting is dry to add finer detail if you find this easier.

Finishing Touches

Once you have finished adding details, you may find that you have finished the painting. Alternatively, you may want to add more colour to the painting with further washes.

When you have gained more confidence, you can look at adding more effects with different techniques, for example, adding salt to the paint or paper.

The Art Gallery

This series has aimed to provide you with the necessary knowledge and skills to develop your own artwork.

Why not encourage participants to get involved and develop your own art gallery? It’s very meaningful and a great way to evidence & celebrate what you’re doing.

During unprecedented times, Oomph! are keen to support with stimulating and varied content for older adults. As part of this, we are releasing resources based on our Oomph! skills workshops.

You can download the PDF of this resource here.

 

To find out more about our new virtual resources and support programme, email us here.

Top Tips For Developing A Painting – Part 2: Starting To Paint

By | Care Home

In this three part special, we give top tips for beginners to pick up their paintbrushes – no matter what their ability.

Now we’ve covered the foundations of sketching here, it’s time to get our brushes out to start painting! Jack McKechnie, our expert Lead Wellbeing Coordinator, guides us through it…

Washing it out

A lot of landscape paintings have the sky in a large block of one colour. This effect is created by adding a simple wash of colour to the background. You can achieve this by mixing a lot of paint with water so that it is watery and pale in colour. Use a big brush and paint this generously onto the paper to cover the area where the sky is.

Wet on wet

Use wet paint on your wet wash (called the “wet on wet technique”) to add additional colour to the sky. This will help you achieve a more natural look. Touches of yellow can help suggest sunshine or grey will give a gloomy landscape. To suggest clouds, you can leave parts of the paper white.

Using colour

It is important to avoid using dark colours straight away! These colours can bleed into lighter colours and can’t be reversed. Instead, start with pale colours and then introduce slightly darker colours, aiming to avoid using dark paints such as black until the end. If you use too much paint, or you’re not happy with the colour, you can remove it when the paint is wet with a paper towel.

Mix it up

A colour wheel allows you to mix colours to create new colours. A great ways to do this is by using primary and secondary colours. For example, you can use blue and red to make purple, if you don’t have it!

During unprecedented times, Oomph! are keen to support with stimulating and varied content for older adults. As part of this, we are releasing resources based on our Oomph! skills workshops. These resources, and more, will be uploaded to our Wellbeing Resources Hub.

 

You can download the PDF of this resource here.

 

To find out more about our new virtual resources and support programme, email us here.

Top Tips For Developing A Painting – Part 1: Sketching

By | Care Home

In this three part special, we give top tips for beginners to pick up their paintbrushes – no matter what their ability.

We start the series with our top tips for sketching. Just like many other art forms, sketching benefits many different areas of our wellbeing. Jack McKechnie, our expert Lead Wellbeing Coordinator, guides us through it…

Sketching as meditation

Sketching can help us relax, reducing stress, agitation and anxiety, and improving our focus. Sketching forces us to pay attention to details in the environment, relieving our brains from the strain of continuous concentration.

This experience is just like meditation and will bring you a sense of calm, balance and peace, which will improve your overall emotional wellbeing!

Mapping out your image

When beginning your sketch, remember there is no right or wrong place to start. Use your pencil to map out your image. For example, you could draw what’s in the background then focus on what is in the middle and foreground. It is up to you how much detail you include but remember that you will eventually paint over this later on in the process!

Under pressure

The harder you press your pencil on to the paper, the harder it will be to rub out. This will mean it will be more likely to show through the paint in the later stages. It is best to be gentle when drawing with a pencil, so that it doesn’t show through the paint.

Scale and proportions

If the participant intends on copying an image, encourage them to look carefully at what is there, keeping in mind scale and proportions. Keep checking back at the original image!

A few pointers for beginners

Know your tools – ensure you are completely comfortable with your grade of pencils, sharpener, eraser and sketch books. It also helps to start with simplified large shapes and save the details until later.

Make sketching a habit and you’ll soon become a pro!

During unprecedented times, Oomph! are keen to support with stimulating and varied content for older adults. As part of this, we are releasing resources based on our Oomph! skills workshops. These resources, and more, will be uploaded to our Wellbeing Resources Hub.

 

You can download the PDF of this resource here.

 

To find out more about our new virtual resources and support programme, email us here.

Oomph! Create Series: Scrapbooking How-To

By | Care Home

The third topic in our Create mini-series is: Scrapbooking.

Scrapbooking is a great activity for expressing your creativity, and a fantastic way to showcase the exciting things you’ve been up to. Jack McKechnie, our expert Lead Wellbeing Coordinator, talks us through the process…

Step one… Choose your topic

Scrapbooking is all about telling a story, so have a think about the story you want to tell! For example, if you are tending to the outdoor garden and preparing it for the summer, could you evidence this journey?

Step two… Sort your photos

When developing pages that are full of photos, it is important to remember that often less is more! It helps to choose a focal point – be aware of where you want your viewer’s eyes to be drawn. This will support with creating bigger impact when people are observing your finished piece. Use photos with the best lighting and avoid dark or blurry images.

Step three… Create a background

Find different materials to work on to make your backgrounds super interesting! You could use paper, but look at different kinds with different consistencies, for example by using vellum or lace paper to give your work transparency.

Finding the perfect paper-crafts supplies is part of the fun! For most pages, you’ll need: Patterned paper and/or card stock, adhesive, embellishments , like ribbon, buttons and stickers, paper trimmer, scissors and page protectors/album.

Step four… The finishing touches

Once your photos are in position (look online for layout inspiration if needed), add text/ journaling to tell a story within your piece. Also, stick on simple embellishments to bring your work to life. For example, try out beads, buttons, confetti, glitter, foam shapes, eyelets, die-cuts, pressed flowers, charms, sequins and stickers.

Double mount your focal point photo & group mount the supporting photos. Then stick your photos to the desired area of the page! Voila – you’re a scrapbooking pro…

If you’d like more scrapbooking inspiration, have a look at these 20 scrapbooking ideas from Country Living, and 35 more ideas here.

During unprecedented times, Oomph! are keen to support with stimulating and varied content for older adults. As part of this, we are releasing resources based on our Oomph! skills workshops. These resources, and more, will be uploaded to our Wellbeing Resources Hub.

 

You can download the PDF of this resource here.

 

To find out more about our new virtual resources and support programme, email us here.

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